Archive for July, 2013

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

Jose Chegüi Torres

Jose Chegüi Torres was the world’s light heavyweight boxing champion during the mid-1960’s. He compiled a record of 41-3-1 with 29 wins by knockout, and won a silver medal in the 1956 Melbourne Olympics.

He was born in Ponce, Puerto Rico and was buried there after a fruitful 73 years.

Chegüi was also a newspaper columnist, and he wrote Sting Like a Bee, a biography of Muhammad Ali, and a biography of Mike Tyson called Fire and Fear.

Chegüi was a much-beloved man who would give you the shirt off his back, and often did. He was always generous with his time, his friendship, and his spirit.

Here is a video of Chegüi winning the light heavyweight title from Willie Pasdtrano: 

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Advertisements

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

José Feliciano

According to many, José Feliciano is the greatest living guitarist in the world. He was born blind in 1945 in Lares, Puerto Rico, and given a cuatro guitar as a present at age 3.

José became quite good at it, and by age 18 we was signed to a recording contract with RCA Victor.

 

Many people know him for Light My Fire and Feliz Navidad. But his musical range includes Spanish classical guitar, blues, R&B, just about every genre imaginable.

Here is a video bio about him. It would have been much better if the announcer shut up, and we could just here José Feliciano play.

But oh, that guitar is marvelous.

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

The Fania Record Label

For 20 years, from 1964 to 1984, Fania Records was the hottest incubator of Latin music in the world. If Salsa was the message, Fania was the post office that delivered it.  

Celia Cruz, Yomo Toro, Hector Lavoe, Larry Harlow, the Palmieri Brothers, Ray Baretto, Joe Bataan, Ruben Blades, Ricardo Ray…the boogaloo, the shingaling, salsa, guaracha, charanga, guaguancó…you name it, Fania had it.

The Fania label was as firmly and aggressively dedicated to “our Latin thing,” as Motown was to black rhythm & blues.                                                   

Here is a YouTube playlist of some of Fania’s greatest artists:   

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

The Fania Record Label

For 20 years, from 1964 to 1984, Fania Records was the hottest incubator of Latin music in the world. If Salsa was the message, Fania was the post office that delivered it.  

Celia Cruz, Yomo Toro, Hector Lavoe, Larry Harlow, the Palmieri Brothers, Ray Baretto, Joe Bataan, Ruben Blades, Ricardo Ray…the boogaloo, the shingaling, salsa, guaracha, charanga, guaguancó…you name it, Fania had it.

The Fania label was as firmly and aggressively dedicated to “our Latin thing,” as Motown was to black rhythm & blues.                                                   

Here is a YouTube playlist of some of Fania’s greatest artists:   

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

Correa Cotto

Correa Cotto beheaded his girlfriend, stabbed his stepfather, and strangled some guy named Luis. He also killed several cops and escaped repeatedly from jail.

On October 30, 1950 he staged a mass riot in El Oso Blanco, the largest prison in

Puerto Rico. Correa escaped that night, with dozens of guards and policemen chasing after him. Since October 30, 1950 was also the date of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Revolts, some people say that Correa was a patriot.

They made three movies about him. Here is a trailer from one of them:

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

 Barceloneta

The town of Barceloneta, Puerto Rico has some

He made many recordings throughout his career, of solo, chamber, and orchestral music, also as conductor, but he is perhaps best remembered for the recordings of the Bach Cello Suites he made from 1936 to 1939.

Pablo Casals’ mother was from Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. He married Marta Montañez y Martinez, a Puerto Rican woman, and lived in Puerto Rico the last 17 years of his life. He made an impact in the Puerto Rican music scene by founding the Puerto Rico Symphony Orchestra in 1958, and the Conservatory of Music of Puerto Rico in 1959.

In 1956 he founded the Casals Music Festival, which continues to be held yearly in San Juan. Here is film clip, of Casals playing the Bach Suite No. 1:

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

 The Borinqueneers

The 65th Infantry Regiment, also known as the Borinqueneers, fought with honor and sacrificed many lives in World War I, World War II, and the Korean War

For some strange reason, the U.S. high command did not hesitate to send the Borinqueneers straight to the front of every war. In World War II alone, they participated in the battles of Naples-Fogis, Rome-Arno, Central Europe, and the Rhineland.

After the Korean War, Gen. Douglas McCarthur said this about the Borinqueneers:

“The Puerto Ricans forming the ranks of the gallant 65th Infantry give daily proof on the battlefields of Korea of their courage, determination and resolute will to victory. They are writing a brilliant record of heroism in battle and I am indeed proud to have them under my command. I wish that we could count on many more like them.”

Here is a short documentary about them:

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

 Pedro Albizu Campos

Pedro Albizu Campos was the first Puerto Rican to graduate from Harvard College and Harvard Law School. He became president of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party, and the most controversial political figure in Puerto Rican history.

He spent 23 years in prison. He was accused of attempting to assassinate President Harry Truman. He led a revolution in 1950 that swept through eight towns in Puerto Rico, including an armed assault on the Governor’s mansion.

Fidel Castro, Che Guevara, and Nelson Mandela studied his life, and learned from his experience. Yet strangely, many people are unaware of this key historical figure.

Here is a short documentary about him:

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo and Leo Machuchal:

Two Fops in Fajardo 

FAJARDO, PR – The law firm of Bobo & Machuchal is hated throughout all of Puerto Rico.

The reason is very simple – they win every case they take on, and make more money than Governor Anibal Acevedo-Vila (a well-known crook).

In all fairness, Juan Bobo and Leo Machuchal have developed a strange courtroom demeanor.

They dress like British barristers, complete with silk underwear and powdered wigs.  For this reason, the San Juan Star has accused them of legal foppery.

Garcia and Machuchal, accused of foppery

The two lawyers are inseparable, which raises a series of other questions. 

What is the relationship of these two men?  Why do they wear the wigs?  Why does Juan Bobo look suspiciously like Charles Laughton?

Juan Bobo presents the “yo no se” defense

The entire island of Puerto Rico is demanding answers. 

Meanwhile Bobo and Machuchal have become multi-millionaires, and will soon star in a TV reality show. 

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo says: Happy July 4th!

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, NYC  – We wish you a fabulous and safe July 4th weekend.

As a public service, we provide conclusive evidence that Juan Bobo was the original symbol of the American Revolution.

Bobo 4th July

The white man has re-written our history and suppressed the truth.

But what the heck…we know that Juan Bobo was there.

So happy July 4th, and please drink responsibly!

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo