Posts Tagged ‘Puerto Rico’

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo Escapes

from Puerto Rico

It was a shame, really. After winning the longest game in baseball history, Juan Bobo organized the most famous party in Puerto Rico. He brought in musicians, prostitutes, roast suckling pig, and his own special rum.

 

Don Q Bobo

 
Juan filled the washing machine with coquito. Bambino found a barrel of sugarcane rum, Choco found twenty cases of Corona, and a Budweiser truck delivered eight ice-cold kegs. And then the wine came, gallons and gallons of it. Juan was ready for anything. He even built a special bar for the occasion.
 

Juan Bobo 3

 
A few fights broke out, but no self-respecting Puerto Rican party would be complete without them. In fact, the mayor of Caguas and two priests were there, and they  joined in the fights, too. 
 
Juan even gave a special performance of Celia Cruz’s greatest hits.
 

Juan Bobo CruzAzucar  !

 
And so it was a shame, really, that Adam Clayton Powell VI got into an argument with Juan Bobo, and the sheriff of Caguas shot Powell in the face. The party didn’t last much longer after that, and there was a lot of leftover chicken.
 
Powell ran down a dusty road, and died a hundred feet from Juan’s house. The sheriff (a.k.a. Papo Bullshit) advised Juan to leave Puerto Rico in a hurry, and Juan agreed.
 
When they reached the airport, they hugged quickly and quietly since there was no time for sentiment. As he looked at Juan for the last time, Papo made the sign of the cross and asked for God’s protection. Then he told Juan to be strong, to play  hard, that el béisbol is about taking your best cut and swinging from the heels, because America is all curveballs.
 

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Advertisements

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

 The United Fruit Company

By 1930 the United Fruit Company owned over one million acres of land in Panama, Guatemala, Honduras, Colombia, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Mexico and Cuba.

 By 1940, in Honduras alone, the United Fruit Company owned 50 percent of all private land in the entire country. In Guatemala, the United Fruit Company owned 75 percent of all private land by 1942 – plus most of Guatemala’s roads, power stations and phone lines, the only Pacific seaport, and every mile of railroad.

By 1930, over 40 percent of all the arable land in Puerto Rico had been converted into sugar plantations, which were entirely owned by ex-Governor Charles Allen and U.S. banking interests. These bank syndicates also owned the entire coastal railroad, and the San Juan international seaport.

The U.S. government (particularly the CIA) supported all these economic exploits. They provided military persuasion whenever necessary. They murdered people in broad daylight, if they got in the way. The most famous of these was the “Banana Massacre” in Columbia.

Here’s more about United Fruit:

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

Roberto C lemente

Roberto Clemente was born Carolina, Puerto Rico. As a child he worked next to his father, loading and unloading trucks in the sugar cane fields. But he loved to play baseball, and became one of the greatest outfielders of all time.

Clemente played with only one team, the Pittsburgh Pirates, throughout his entire career (1955 through 1972). He was the National League MVP in 1966, a National League All-Star for twelve seasons, received 12 Gold Glove Awards, and led the National League in batting average four times. In 1972, Clemente got his 3,000th major league hit.                               

On December 31, 1972, while en route to deliver aid to earthquake victims in Nicaragua, Clemente died in an airplane crash. He was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame almost immediately in 1973, becoming the first Latino ever selected and one of only two Hall of Fame members for whom the mandatory five-year waiting period had been waived, the other being Lou Gehrig.

Roberto Clemente was one of the great ones. Here is a video of his 3,000th career hit:

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

Lolita Lebron

On March 1, 1954, four members of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party walked into the visitor’s gallery of U.S. Congress. They opened fire on the politicians below, shooting 30 times and injuring 5 congressmen.

A woman named Lolita Lebron was their leader. She was arrested and sentenced to life imprisonment. During her trial she stated

“I did not come to kill anybody. I came to die for my country.”

 

25 years later, in 1979, her sentence was commuted by President Jimmy Carter. Upon her release, she was received as a hero in Puerto Rico.

Here is a short documentary about Lolita Lebron. It is a bit one-sided, using the words “maniac” and “fanatic.” The same could be said about Patrick Henry and George Washington.

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

 Pablo Casals

Pablo Casals was the pre-eminent cellist of the first half of the 20th century, and one of the greatest cellists of all time.

He made many recordings throughout his career, of solo, chamber, and orchestral music, also as conductor, but he is perhaps best remembered for the recordings of the Bach Cello Suites he made from 1936 to 1939.

Pablo Casals’ mother was from Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. He married Marta Montañez y Martinez, a Puerto Rican woman, and lived in Puerto Rico the last 17 years of his life. He made an impact in the Puerto Rican music scene by founding the Puerto Rico Symphony Orchestra in 1958, and the Conservatory of Music of Puerto Rico in 1959.

In 1956 he founded the Casals Music Festival, which continues to be held yearly in San Juan. Here is film clip, of Casals playing the Bach Suite No. 1:

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

Jose Chegüi Torres

Jose Chegüi Torres was the world’s light heavyweight boxing champion during the mid-1960’s. He compiled a record of 41-3-1 with 29 wins by knockout, and won a silver medal in the 1956 Melbourne Olympics.

He was born in Ponce, Puerto Rico and was buried there after a fruitful 73 years.

Chegüi was also a newspaper columnist, and he wrote Sting Like a Bee, a biography of Muhammad Ali, and a biography of Mike Tyson called Fire and Fear.

Chegüi was a much-beloved man who would give you the shirt off his back, and often did. He was always generous with his time, his friendship, and his spirit.

Here is a video of Chegüi winning the light heavyweight title from Willie Pasdtrano: 

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

José Feliciano

According to many, José Feliciano is the greatest living guitarist in the world. He was born blind in 1945 in Lares, Puerto Rico, and given a cuatro guitar as a present at age 3.

José became quite good at it, and by age 18 we was signed to a recording contract with RCA Victor.

 

Many people know him for Light My Fire and Feliz Navidad. But his musical range includes Spanish classical guitar, blues, R&B, just about every genre imaginable.

Here is a video bio about him. It would have been much better if the announcer shut up, and we could just here José Feliciano play.

But oh, that guitar is marvelous.

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

Correa Cotto

Correa Cotto beheaded his girlfriend, stabbed his stepfather, and strangled some guy named Luis. He also killed several cops and escaped repeatedly from jail.

On October 30, 1950 he staged a mass riot in El Oso Blanco, the largest prison in

Puerto Rico. Correa escaped that night, with dozens of guards and policemen chasing after him. Since October 30, 1950 was also the date of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Revolts, some people say that Correa was a patriot.

They made three movies about him. Here is a trailer from one of them:

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

 Barceloneta

The town of Barceloneta, Puerto Rico has some

He made many recordings throughout his career, of solo, chamber, and orchestral music, also as conductor, but he is perhaps best remembered for the recordings of the Bach Cello Suites he made from 1936 to 1939.

Pablo Casals’ mother was from Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. He married Marta Montañez y Martinez, a Puerto Rican woman, and lived in Puerto Rico the last 17 years of his life. He made an impact in the Puerto Rican music scene by founding the Puerto Rico Symphony Orchestra in 1958, and the Conservatory of Music of Puerto Rico in 1959.

In 1956 he founded the Casals Music Festival, which continues to be held yearly in San Juan. Here is film clip, of Casals playing the Bach Suite No. 1:

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

 Pedro Albizu Campos

Pedro Albizu Campos was the first Puerto Rican to graduate from Harvard College and Harvard Law School. He became president of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party, and the most controversial political figure in Puerto Rican history.

He spent 23 years in prison. He was accused of attempting to assassinate President Harry Truman. He led a revolution in 1950 that swept through eight towns in Puerto Rico, including an armed assault on the Governor’s mansion.

Fidel Castro, Che Guevara, and Nelson Mandela studied his life, and learned from his experience. Yet strangely, many people are unaware of this key historical figure.

Here is a short documentary about him:

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo