Posts Tagged ‘YouTube’

Juan bobo

Joselito Canta

Juan Bobo’s campaign for congress is running out of money. To raise come quick funds, Bobo started singing Jibaro tunes in Times Square. Israeli producer Arnon Milchan happened to be in town, and quickly signed Bobo to a three-picture deal, where he plays a singing teenage shepherd.

“My films are foolproof,” said Milchan. “All Bobo has to do is sing and chase sheep into a cave.” 

Juan Bobo Ruisenor

 

Mr. Milchan was kind enough to provide a film clip.

But Bobo needs more than YouTube.  He needs money for his congressional campaign. We hope that Milchan pays Leo quickly, in time for the election. 

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Advertisements

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

Piri Thomas

In 1967, a raw and disturbing autobiography was published by Knopf Doubleday. It was called Down these Mean Streets by Piri Thomas.

A Puerto Rican ex-felon, Piri wrote a scathing account of his East Harlem childhood, and the choices he made which landed him in prison. The language was sharp and unvarnished. The publisher saw great dramatic value in giving Piri free rein, to tell his story in his own vernacular.

The book caught on and has been in print ever since, for nearly fifty years. Martin Scorcese’s second feature film, Mean Streets, borrowed its title and ambience.

The New York Times celebrated its dysfunction, calling it “a report from the guts and heart.”

There is clearly more to the Puerto Rican (or any) experience than crime, drugs, prison and family dysfunction. But Piri was ghetto fabulous, Piri delivered the “real deal,” and Piri got published.

Here is a YouTube video about the life and work of Piri Thomas:

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

The Fania Record Label

For 20 years, from 1964 to 1984, Fania Records was the hottest incubator of Latin music in the world. If Salsa was the message, Fania was the post office that delivered it.  

Celia Cruz, Yomo Toro, Hector Lavoe, Larry Harlow, the Palmieri Brothers, Ray Baretto, Joe Bataan, Ruben Blades, Ricardo Ray…the boogaloo, the shingaling, salsa, guaracha, charanga, guaguancó…you name it, Fania had it.

The Fania label was as firmly and aggressively dedicated to “our Latin thing,” as Motown was to black rhythm & blues.                                                   

Here is a YouTube playlist of some of Fania’s greatest artists:   

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

The Fania Record Label

For 20 years, from 1964 to 1984, Fania Records was the hottest incubator of Latin music in the world. If Salsa was the message, Fania was the post office that delivered it.  

Celia Cruz, Yomo Toro, Hector Lavoe, Larry Harlow, the Palmieri Brothers, Ray Baretto, Joe Bataan, Ruben Blades, Ricardo Ray…the boogaloo, the shingaling, salsa, guaracha, charanga, guaguancó…you name it, Fania had it.

The Fania label was as firmly and aggressively dedicated to “our Latin thing,” as Motown was to black rhythm & blues.                                                   

Here is a YouTube playlist of some of Fania’s greatest artists:   

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson

Joe Bataan 

Joe Bataan was a Salsa pioneer during the 1960’s and 1970’s. He founded the Latin Swingers band, and created a distinctive melodic mix of Latin boogaloo and African American doo-wop.

Bataan released eight original titles for Fania Records, which included the gold-selling Riot!

Joe Bataan

 

In 1973, Bataan helped coin the phrase “salsoul” and co-founded the Salsoul Records label, for which he recorded three albums and several singles.  In 1979, his Rap-O Clap-O became an early hip hop hit. After his 1981 album, “Bataan II,” he retired from music-making to spend more time with his family and to work as a youth counselor .

In 2005, Bataan broke his long hiatus with the release of Call My Name, a well-received album recorded for Spain’s Vampisoul label.

Joe Bataan was, and remains, a unique artist with a great commitment toward his community. He is a true gentleman, and a terrific role model.

Here is a YouTube sample of an early Bataan classic:

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo Income Tax Tip

April 15th is around the corner.

Juan Bobo has reviewed all the facts.

Forget about saving your receipts, deducting your dog, or using a fake business with a web site as a tax dodge.

After studying the 2013 Federal budget…our multi-trillion dollar deficit…the chaos in our educational system…the hustlers in film and publishing…the liars in Washington and Wall Street…the death of our economy…the absence of jobs…the lack of public trust in any of our institutions…Juan Bobo advises you to save every penny…and tell the IRS to go to hell because…

Time Bobo

 

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

The Fania Record Label

For 20 years, from 1964 to 1984, Fania Records was the hottest incubator of Latin music in the world. If Salsa was the message, Fania was the post office that delivered it.

Celia Cruz, Yomo Toro, Hector Lavoe, Larry Harlow, the Palmieri Brothers, Ray Baretto, Joe Bataan, Ruben Blades, Ricardo Ray…the boogaloo, the shingaling, salsa, guaracha, charanga, guaguancó…you name it, Fania had it.

The Fania label was as firmly and aggressively dedicated to “our Latin thing,” as Motown was to black rhythm & blues.                                                   

Here is a YouTube playlist of some of Fania’s greatest artists:

The Chronicles of Juan Bobo

Juan bobo

Juan Bobo History Lesson:

Piri Thomas

In 1967, a raw and disturbing autobiography was published by Knopf Doubleday. It was called Down these Mean Streets by Piri Thomas.

A Puerto Rican ex-felon, Piri wrote a scathing account of his East Harlem childhood, and the choices he made which landed him in prison. The language was sharp and unvarnished. The publisher saw great dramatic value in giving Piri free rein, to tell his story in his own vernacular.

The book caught on and has been in print ever since, for nearly fifty years. Martin Scorcese’s second feature film, Mean Streets, borrowed its title and ambience.

The New York Times celebrated its dysfunction, calling it “a report from the guts and heart.”

There is clearly more to the Puerto Rican (or any) experience than crime, drugs, prison and family dysfunction. But Piri was ghetto fabulous, Piri delivered the “real deal,” and Piri got published.

Here is a YouTube video about the life and work of Piri Thomas: